Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Statement

The Challenger Society for Marine Science is a learned society for marine scientists in the UK, aimed at advancing the study and application of marine science, encouraging collaboration across a full range of disciplines and sectors with interests in the marine sciences, holding regular scientific discussion meetings and forums, and to disseminate knowledge through blogs and publications.

We are pleased that we have increased the representation of Early Career Researchers and international researchers, and improved gender balance, at the Challenger Society science meetings. However, we also recognise that there is a long way to go for us to be a fully equitable and inclusive organisation. We would like to state our commitment to positive action to improve i) diversity monitoring and reporting, and ii) pipeline support, visibility and accessibility for underrepresented marine researchers and students, including but not limited to class, disability, ethnicity, gender, neurodiversity and sexuality.

Latest News

Is fieldwork a requirement for a career in marine science?

Please save the date for an introductory and perception gathering event run by a subset of the Challenger Society EDIA working group. The virtual event will focus on ‘Evaluating perceptions of job roles in marine research and raising awareness of digital twinning of the oceans to promote diversity and inclusivity in the marine sciences.’ The event will take place on the 27th of January 2022 13:30-15:30 on zoom.


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The Decade Working Group (DWG): Update

In the UK marine community the United Nations Decade of Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030), hereafter ‘the Decade’, is gaining growing publicity. What is less well established is how UK marine researchers can participate in the Decade and how funding for research will emerge.

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New NERC Ocean Observations Consultation

The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) has asked the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) to lead a piece of work on prioritising the sustained ocean observations that are most important to the UK and the international effort. 

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